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to tijuana and released. no lawyer in that process. every religion that i'm familiar with teaches that things like that are not the right way to go and we do have public officials who are happy to mention their own religion and i get a kick out of it and check their voting record because on this issue and on your issue, they are part of the problem. who are they? they are your friends. they are the people you like. they like environmental things, other things. these things i tried to talk to them and so have others much more powerful than i am. he was in mexico for 3 months. he had a mental breakdown. he thought he was dead. to check if he was dead he stepped out in front of a trick and the truck missed him. and his mother went day in and day out to check the bodies in tijuana and finally he wondered back and finally the lawyers at a c l u, made a case t . the government was unrepent ant. the best way to do is go to the place and look at the people and be a voice coming out as best you can and say this is what i saw and on the 5th floor, some of them well-dressed people i mentioned in my sta
religion correspondent lauren green is here next. it's a pig fight, a family forced out of their home over their pet. the controversy behind this coming up. ♪ [ male announcer ] in blind taste tests, even ragu users chose prego. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] wonder what other questionable choices i've made? i choose date number 2! whooo! [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. [ sigh of relief ] all right that's a fifth-floor probleok.. not in my house! ha ha ha! ha ha ha! no no no! not today! ha ha ha! ha ha ha! jimmy how happy are folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico? happier than dikembe mutumbo blocking a shot. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. >> welcome back. time for your shot of the morni morning. [cat meowing] >> cats and dogs calling a truce. and the cat is herding the puppies. >> in a reversal of the natural order, it's a cat herding puppies. >> clayton: amazing, one wary dog, i don't know about this, is he leading me into a trap. this video of course -- this video h
that two weeks ago true religion, the jeans company announced it wouldn't be renewing its contract with its founder and now former ceo who stepped down this tuesday. today we found out from the "new york post" those firms true religion is trying to sell itself to might be getting out of the bidding. an unexpected leadership change is rarely a sign good things are happening. of course, not all unexpected ceo departures are negative. when a bad ceo gets the boot, see you later, that's always a good thing. hence why we have the "mad money" wall of shame to call out these incompetents. sometimes the boards need to see them on the wall of shame to get motivated. everybody already understands that things are going poorly. for example, the dog that is groupon roared after it announced its foolish founder and ceo andrew mason was being axed at the end of february. same thing happened to avon when wall of shamer andrea young was forced to resign as ceo last april and had to step down as chairman in october. what about when a good ceo leaves, or a great one? we never like losing a talented manager. i
? >> right. just for all purposes of full disclosure here, i think that -- i believe in religion and i'm not an atheist by any means. but this has been very clear and determined by the courts that this is a violation of the establishment clause of the constitution or the first amendment. and why that is is because you can not have an entanglement of public and religion here. that's what's going on. this is a public school and this is the school putting a seal of approval on a religious piece of art. >> ainsley: okay. david, we want to hear the other side of this because any time we see a nativity, a portrait of jesus, the ten commands, we know it's a matter of time before the aclu will get involved. do they have a case here? >> certainly they may have a case burks i don't think they're going to be victorious. it's not as easy it was just explained. this is a convoluted type of thing. this particular situation is sponsored by a private club within a public school. the supreme court has been very clear -- >> which case? you're absolutely wrong. there has been no case. >> i'm in the middl
of life, every background, every religion. and if they've got a good idea and willing to work hard, they can succeed. and that's got to be something that's more consistently spoken about not just you know in the syria situation, but i think with respect to this enormous moment of both promise but also danger in the arab world in north africa. >> julie. >> thank you, mr. president. you mentioned the aftermath of the assad regime. there's a lot of concern in jordan and elsewhere that the upheaval in syria is creating havens for extremism. how concerned are you at this point that extremists or jihadists could actually take over in syria and perhaps be even worse than assad? and i was also hoping you could give us some insight into how you brokered the call today between prime ministers and how much of their willingness to talk is actually driven by the urgency in syria. and, your majesty, you have offered assad asylum which he rejected, does that offer of asylum still stand? thank you. >> well, i am very concerned about syria becoming an enclave for extremists because extremists thriv
this debate and they talk about religion and the debate of same sex marriage, a lot of people the knee-jerk reaction is the bible condemns this, the bible condemns this. what do you say to that? >> well, certainly if you look for the witness scripture you're not going to find anything about gay marriage. you're going to see scattered passages about homosexuality but because it's on long-term monogamous between same sex couples, that silence we need to understand it. the bible says as much about gay marriage as it does about the internet. and we are living in a different time. and our church as a witness to couples that are very powerfully in love with each other and are witnessing in their faith. one of the things we say in the wedding ceremony in the united methodist liturgy is the couple creates a new ministry for the church. well, our congregation has been blessed by the witness of gay and lesbian couples who have been in those long-term relationships who have a deep commitment that it's about love, it's not about other things that people want to raise up around issues with scriptur
or religion or cult the arrogance of their superiority reminds us that they do not give us right. we grant them power. they do not make us free. we are free already. as long as we have the second amendment, we always will be. we are america, and our politicians are only as powerful as we, the people, allow them to be. the nra ad -- philip rucker, how effective is the nra message right now? guest: a message like that is effective with the base of the nra and many americans that live in some of these dates -- it's dates -- states. you play and add like that in ,est virginia, north carolina north dakota, and it resonates. it is a message about the elite in washington and san francisco, which is a reference to nancy pelosi, the democratic leaders in the house, and it is really trying to create these cultural divisions between decision- makers in washington and people back home who have guns and use them for sport. host: "political" tells us that nra fundraising is that the best in a decade. guest: the nra also reports that membership is growing, something the nra has been effective and skilled
. to stand with us on freedom of speech and freedom of religion and freedom of the press. secondly, it is the economics and the bonds that bind us together. the united states represent about one fourth of the world's gross domestic product. the nations of europe represent more. nato is about 50% of the gdp. it is $4 trillion per year across the atlantic. so i think the transatlantic connection has an important economic component as well. third, geography does matter. sometimes people say to me, they are the bastions of the cold war. i would counter by saying that it's not. they are forward operating bases in the 21st century. they allow us to extend support from eucom in that area as well. fourth, i would say that nato would serve together around the world is a wide variety of missions that we can talk about this morning. fifth and finally, nowhere else in the world will we find such an elite and capable group of allies who have the technology, the training, the levels to help us. we need to encourage our european partners to spend more on defense. i do that consistently, i'm glad
come to you to talk about religion at all? guest: we would treat them -- that's another thing. -- re portrayed as just about oil and about greed, i take great exception to that. i believe it does a disservice to those men and women who went and volunteered to go, especially in our medical facilities. at one time, we were treating one of our wounded service members and the person who wounded him. and our folks gave the treatment that they were supposed to give. if anybody else in the world wants to throw stones at us in america, they can go right ahead, but i will point to those kinds of examples to show why we are the freest, greatest country in the world. when we go in -- we left. we did not take a part of iraq. we did not say this is going to be our little piece of ground did we did what we needed to do, and now we are gone -- of ground. andid what we needed to do now we are gone. we are out. iraq is a sovereign country. america, that is who we are. i think that needs to be communicated. host: clint in texas. a democratic caller. go ahead. caller: i just wanted to make a comment. i
the world's religions have to that tiny swath of land, and a symbolically rich way for a christian u.s. president to wrap up a trip that has focused on sealing bonds with the jewish state. a trip that the white house and american and israeli officials at this point seem quite pleased with. >> you are in amman, jordan, where the president will be meeting with jordan's king abdullah. he's a very close ally of the u.s. but he is under a tremendous amount of pressure, both internally and externally. so what's on the agenda for the meetings there? >> well, the president lands here in three hours. he's going to have a meeting with king abdullah then speak briefly to the press. only one question on each side and then the two men will have a dinner. as you point out, jordan is a close u.s. ally. the country has a peace treaty with israel. and it's also home to close to 2 million palestinians. so, it would be an important player in any peace negotiations. so that would come up and be up for discussion. but there are other more immediate issues for them right now. syria, jordan has taken in mo
of religion and freedom of the press. secondly, it is the economics and the bonds that bind us together. the united states represent about one fourth of the world's gross domestic product. the nations of europe represent more. nato is about 50% of the gdp. it is $4 trillion per year across the atlantic. so i think the transatlantic connection has an important economic component as well. third, geography does matter. sometimes people say to me, they are the bastions of the cold war. i would counter by saying that it's not. they are forward operating bases in the 21st century. they allow us to extend support from eucom in that area as well. fourth, i would say that nato would serve together around the world is a wide variety of missions that we can talk about this morning. fifth and finally, nowhere else in the world will we find such an elite and capable group of allies who have the technology, the training, the levels to help us. we need to encourage our european partners to spend more on defense. i do that consistently, i'm glad to talk about that today. but i do believe these connecti
don't believe everything should be put up to a sproept freedom to speech, freedom of religion, freedom to smaer not something we take votes on. it belongs to all of us under the constitution and that is why we have court. >> freedom to marry belongs to everyone, but what marriage is, you're talking about redefining marriage. >> marriage is not defined by who's denied it. >> this isn't "cross fire." i want to end with you. go ahead. >> an odd way to think about constitutional law to sap that the court should refrain from deciding whether something is constitutional or not, even if it would be advantageous for the nation as a whole to have the conversation continue in politics. the court is a passive body. it doesn't get to decide whether to take a case, also doesn't get to decide once a case is befores it, granted review to punt on that case simply because the politician conversation vo continue. something is either constitutional or it's not. >> and they are constitution. >> it's difficult to predict what the high court lieutenant do -- will do in a case like this, based on obama care.
. it's a cross section of race, religion, color, age, you know, from a 20-year-old to a 70-year-old. and everybody needs that truck. and it's such a -- you know, it's a metaphor for the american dream and survival of the fittest. it starts out absurd because you're like what's the sport, you go like this. but, you know, 16 hours into it, you just desperately want everyone to win that truck. >> so i was asking how you came up with this idea. you're like straight out of broadway. you're not straight out of broadway. how did this happen? how did you guys come together? >> we met through a mutual friend and started writing songs, just songs. >> oh, really? >> we actually live three blocks away from each other. >> oh, okay. that will do it. >> and we were having a great time writing songs and amanda asked me to join the team, the hardbody team and so off we went. >> what's it been like? >> it's been thrilling. >> i mean the difference especially from being in a band to now doing this? >> very different. well, it's been a roller coaster ride. it's a gigantic team of people working tog
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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